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Home > Del Stelling photo collection 1963 - mid 1980s

Last additions - Del Stelling photo collection 1963 - mid 1980s
1985_LA_Chart_House_ship.jpg
Chart House Lakeville1985 - Chart House Lakeville.Dec 04, 2021
1985_LA_Chart_House_June_2.jpg
Chart House Lakeville1985 - Chart House, Lakeville.Dec 04, 2021
1985_LA_Chart_House_pool_June.jpg
Chart House Lakeville1985 - the popular Chart House in Lakeville.Dec 04, 2021
1983_BU_Bravettes_3.jpg
Burnsville High School Bravettes1983 - award willing Bravettes.Dec 04, 2021
1983_BU_Bravettes_6.jpg
Burnsville High School Bravettes1983 award - Dec 04, 2021
1983_BU_Bravettes_8_march.jpg
Burnsville High School Bravettes1983 award - Dec 04, 2021
1985_BU_Burningham_apt_3.jpg
Burningham Apartments1985 view of Burningham apartments at 1505 Burnsville Parkway.Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_View_of_Stage_Coach.jpg
Stage Coach 1981The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.



Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_Side_view_of_Stage_coach.jpg
Stage Coach 1981The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.



Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_Opera_House.jpg
Stage Coach 1981The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.



Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_Front_of_Stage_coach.jpg
Stage Coach 1981The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.



Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_Fuller_view.jpg
Stage Coach 1981The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.



Dec 04, 2021
1981_SA_Doors_to_Stage_Coach.jpg
Stage Coach 1981 The Stagecoach started out as an actual stagecoach stop called the Four Mile House between Shakopee and Savage in the horse and wagon days.

In about 1951, Osborne “Ozzie” and Marie Klavestad found the old place by accident and bought it for a place to display Ozzie’s gun collection. They named it the Stagecoach Museum, and over the years it expanded to include the Stagecoach Restaurant, Stagecoach Opera House and the Sand Burr Gulch, a recreated old west street complete with blacksmith, barber shop, saloon, and animated cowboy puppets that acted out jerky wild west scenes for the general public.

In May 1970, the Stagecoach Inn opened – Will Jones characterized it as “an entirely new and separate establishment, a vast two-story frontier-type dining hall and saloon. Klavestad had held a liquor license but never used it until Ray Colihan and his partners, twins Billy and Jimmy Robertson of the Minnesota Twins, bought the food and beverage concession and the right to the Stagecoach name. It was officially called the Twins Stagecoach Inn to distinguish it from the museum and theater. The balcony, called “Reggie’s Roost,” could hold 400 people, and had a 65-foot bar that Colihan called the longest in Scott County.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.

THE END OF THE STAGECOACH

A fire on June 21, 1979, was the last straw, doing $10,000 in damage. Although Montana Star was scheduled to play on June 22-23, 1979, it appears that the last band to play at Doc Holliday’s was, in a macabrely appropriate way, called Headstone. The owners withdrew their application to renew their liquor license and it expired on June 30, 1979.

An ad appeared on November 7, 1979, soliciting someone to lease the 17,000 sq. ft. property.

The Klavestads sold out in 1981 and the place fell into ruin. Widening of Highway 101 spelled doom for the site and most of it was demolished in 1996. Sandra Kenyon thinks the Doc Holliday’s site is gone, but the original Stagecoach building still stands as Dahlen Signs, 901 Stagecoach Road, Shakopee.








Dec 04, 2021
1981_BU_Sky_Oaks_School.jpg
Sky Oaks SchoolView of the front of Sky Oaks School 1981.Dec 04, 2021
1981_BU_Faith_Covenant_Aug.jpg
Faith Covenant Church1981 - Faith Covenant Church, Nicollet Avenue.Dec 04, 2021
1981_BU_August_Faith_Convenant_Church.jpg
Faith Covenant Church 1981 - Faith Covenant Church, Nicollet Avenue.
Dec 04, 2021
1985_SA_April_Ed_McQuiston.jpg
Ed McQuiston1985 - volunteer fire fighter Ed McQuiston.Dec 04, 2021
1985_SA_McQuiston_Ed.jpg
Ed McQuiston1985 - volunteer fire fighter Ed McQuiston.Dec 04, 2021
1988_St__Johns_lunch.jpg
St. John the Baptist School1988 - Lunch time at St. John the Baptist School.Dec 04, 2021
1988_SA_Feb_Library_at_St_Johns.jpg
St. John the Baptist School1988 - Student in the library at St. John the Baptist School.Dec 04, 2021
1988_SA_St__John_student_with_computer.jpg
St. John the Baptist School1988 - student and instructor at computer.Dec 04, 2021
1964_SA_Master_spec_building.jpg
Master Spec 1964Master Specialty made automotive accessories, car wash brushes, snow scraper brushes, plug in heaters, etc. They were eventually purchased by Andy Granatelli (yes that Andy) and became part of the same company that made STP automotive additives.Dec 04, 2021
1964_SA_Master_Spec.jpg
Master Spec 1964Master Specialty made automotive accessories, car wash brushes, snow scraper brushes, plug in heaters, etc. They were eventually purchased by Andy Granatelli (yes that Andy) and became part of the same company that made STP automotive additives.Dec 04, 2021
Master_Spec_another_view.jpg
Master SpecMaster Specialty made automotive accessories, car wash brushes, snow scraper brushes, plug in heaters, etc. They were eventually purchased by Andy Granatelli (yes that Andy) and became part of the same company that made STP automotive additives.Dec 04, 2021
1983_SA_Joe_Egan_and_Art_Williams.jpg
Joe Egan and Art WilliamsJoe Egan and Art Williams with lantern. Dec 04, 2021
1980s_SA_Joe_Egan_plaque_2.jpg
Joe EganJoe Egan shares Dan Patch History 1980s.Dec 04, 2021
1980s_SA_Joe_Egan_and_Dan_Patch_photo.jpg
Joe EganJoe Egan shares Dan Patch History, 1980s.Dec 04, 2021
Mary_Kay_Kearney_photo.jpg
Mary Kay KearneyDaughter of Gene and Mary Kearney, family operated the grocery store in Savage - Mary Kay.Dec 03, 2021
Scrub_Coleman.jpg
Savage Pacers - Scrub ColemanScrub "Irv" Coleman.Dec 03, 2021
1980_BU_Sept_25_-_Nicollet_and_13_road.jpg
Road workRoad work at Nicollet Avenue and Highway 13, September 1980. Dec 02, 2021
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