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Nicollet_reconstruction_Sep_1970.jpg
Nicollet Avenue reconstruction 1970Old aerial photos show that Nicollet (southbound) once ended at 138th street and was not extended until the late 50's. Until 1970 it still veered left (west) on Nicollet Lane at about 135th Street. The photo shows construction of the new alignment at right edge of photo. At extreme top center is the Concrete Plant (tower visible). Highway 13 is the horizontal roadway just beneath it. The lower of the two Interstate 35W interchanges is carrying Burnsville Crosstown (later Parkway). At very bottom is a portion of 136th street.Dec 23, 2016
Personnel_and_Planning_Commission_1965.pdf
Personnel and Planing Commission 1965BURNSVILLE VILLAGE personnel at work at the village hall. They are from left: Fran Gaston, assessment clerk; Charles Christensen, assessor; Evelyn Kjos, secretary; Sivert Hendrickson, building inspector; John Hiebert, plumbing and
heating inspector; Joe Connelly, sewer and water maintenanc man; Ralph Ackerman, sewer and water supervisor; Audrey Kalmoe, receptionist-secretary and Arlene Sykes, clerk-typlst

THE PLANNING COMMISSION in the village is made up of seven men appointed by the council to serve three year rotating terms. They meet twice monthly on the second and last Tuesdays. Shown are the commission members at a recent
meeting from left: Carlton E. Coats, Gordon Hackman, Charle McDonald, John D, Vars and Richard Brooks. Not pictured are chairman Donald Lodge and David Pomerenke.
Dec 23, 2016
PD_and_Water_Sewer.pdf
Police Water Sewer1965
MEMBERS OF THE Burnsville Police Department are (seated from left) Richard Rader macher, Michael Dumoulin, Richard Goodspeed, Paul Anselman and Dean Brown; (standin from left) LeRoy Holman, Vic Anderson, Sgt. Robert French, Sgt. Jay Butler and Miml Chris tensen, secretary.

WATER & SEWER department men are shown with one of the department trucks. They are from left: Bob Michael, Joe Connelly, Jim Gibbish and Ralph Ackerman, supervisor.
Dec 23, 2016
Village_Government_Busier.pdf
Village Government Busier 1965BURNSVILLE VILLAGE personnel at work at the village hall. They are from left: Fran Gaston, assessment clerk; Charles Christensen, assessor; Evelyn Kjos, secretary; Sivert Hendrickson, building inspector; John Hiebert, plumbing and
heating inspector; Joe Connelly, sewer and water man; Ralph Ackerman, sewer and water supervisor; Audrey Kalmoe, receptionist-secretary and Arlene Sykes, clerk-typist.
THE COUNCIL of the village of Burnsville at a recent council meeting is from left: Deanne Anderson, council secretary, Clerk Michael O’Connor, Trustee Warren Kelly, Mayor Roger Rich­ardson, Trustees Ray Connelly and Charles Wahlberg. The
council meets the first and third Monday of each month at the village hall. The members of the council are also active on various working committees in village government.
THE PLANNING COMMISSION in the village is made up of meeting from left: Carlton E. Coats, Gordon Hackman, Charlei seven men appointed by the council to serve three year rotating McDonald, John D. Vars and Richard Brooks. Not picture! terms. They meet twice monthly on the second and last are chairman Donald Lodge and David Pomerenke.
Dec 23, 2016
Second_Village_Election.pdf
Second Village council electionOct 23, 1965 Most of the candidates for Burnsville village offices have voluntarily submitted filing statements which have appeared in previous issues of the MINNESOTA VALLEY REVIEW.
For the benefit of the voter, the REVIEW herewith presents a resume of the candidates* qualifications and a brief statement from each as to present or future problems facing the village.
Roger A. Richardson
Roger A. Richardson, 43, a candidate for reelection as Mayor of Burnsville, was first elected to the Town Board in 1961. (more)
Dec 23, 2016
1965-SecondCouncil.jpg
The Council of the Village of BurnsvilleThe Council of the Village of Burnsville after recent council meeting is from left: Deanne Anderson, council secretary, Clerk Michael O'Connor, trustee Warren Kelly, Mayor Roger Richardson, trustees Ray Connolly and Charles Wahlberg. The council meets the first and third Monday of each month at the Village Hall. The members of the council are also active on various working committeesIn village government.
(second council 1965)
Dec 22, 2016
M_Valley_Review_Annexation.pdf
MN Valley Review on Annexation, ReactionThe outline for legal action to regain the Black Dog plant property and to prevent the annexation of the whole township was given last night (Wednesday) at the citizen's meeting held at the Burnsville school.
In a statement to the Review yesterday, attorney Dave Grannis said the township would file its suit by the end of the week. The action will attack the validity of the Bloomington
city council annexation ordinance on the grounds it is both unreasonable and unconstitutional, Grannis said. Further arguments, involving the petition for annexation, will be presented.
Grannis also said the petition of Burnsville township to incorporate into a village had been filed Tuesday afternoon with the state municipal commission. Commission members Joe Robbie and Robert Edman were out of town, so action on the petition will be delayed. The commission is expected to set a public hearing in the township within the next six to eight weeks. (more) August 31, 1961
Dec 22, 2016
1961-08-31DakCoTrib-CrowdatTownHall.jpg
Crowd at Townhall August 1961Dakota County Tribune, August 31, 1961. Crowd jammed into the Burnsville Townhall Wednesday night here how black dog power plant had suddenly become the property of the Bloomington city to the north. Another mass meeting was planned for Wednesday night of this week at the Burnsville school.Dec 22, 2016
1961-AnnexationMeeting.jpg
Strategy Mapping in August 1961The Burnsville Township Board of commissioners met in August 1961 to map strategy to deal with Bloomington's attempt to annex 160 acres from Burnsville Township, acquiring a large chunk of the river valley and northern states powers black dog power plant in the process.The civic groups were formed to stop at Bloomington's actions.Dec 22, 2016
1961-SupremeCourtCase.pdf
Cover of Supreme Court Case on AnnexationDec 22, 2016
Annexation_Flyer_from_Bloomington.pdf
Annexation Flyer from Bloomington(nine page brochure including map) Some time ago the City of Bloomington firmly requested the Northern States Power Company to consent to Bloomington taking the Black Dog Power Plant into the boundaries of the City of Bloomington. As Minnesota's fourth largest city, and one of NSP's largest customers, Bloomington contended that it should share economic value of the Black Dog Power Plant.
The following facts were pointed out to NSP:
Dec 22, 2016
Burnsville_Burns__Bloomington_Cool.pdf
Burnsville Burns. Bloomington Cool - Annexation Draws Envy, Sympathy(excerpt) By GWENYTH JONES
Minneapolis Star Staff Writer City Manager Ray Olsen says Bloomington officials have been surprised at the “amount and bitterness” of the objections in Burnsville when Bloomington suddenly annexed the 100-million-dollar Northern States Power Black Dog plant....He flatly denied Blooming­ ton “made a deal” with NSP. He said the only promise the city made to the company was not to use the tax reve­nue from the plant to add to its budget, but to collect the same total revenue from a lowered tax rate.
By PAUL GILJE
Minneapolis Star Staff Writer
Public sympathy for Burnsville and private envy of Bloomington have been ex­pressed by officials in other suburbs in the wake of Bloomington’s annexation moves last week.
But apparently they see little connection between this and their own long-term fears of possible annexation by Minneapolis.
( Bergerud DeGhetto Illies ) Thurs., Aug. 31, 1961
Dec 22, 2016
Burnsvillians_Burn.pdf
Burnsvillians Burn over Black Dog MoveResidents in Burnsville township today were burning over Bloomington’s annexation of their tax-rich Black Dog power plant.
Charges of “land grab” and “pressure politics” rose from township residents as they prepared to fight the annex­ation, which came in a surprise announcement Wednesday.
Bloomington added on the 159-acre plant at the request of Northern States Power Co., then launched an immediate campaign to merge the remainder of Burnsville with Bloom­ington.
Within hours after the an­nouncement signs proclaming, “Never will we join Bloomington” appeared at the service station, tap room and grocery store at Lynrose corners in Burnsville.
The corner, traditionally a bellweather of public senti­ment, is owned by Francis Popehn, who said he gave up his tavern in Bloomington in 1957 to escape high taxes.
“Most of the people that have been in here today are just plain mad about the annexation,” Popehn said. “This thing came as a huge shock. There seems to be nothing sound behind it.” THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1961
( Popehn Gallagher Wenthold Valley View Motel Johnson )
Dec 22, 2016
1961-AnnexMapDrawing.jpg
Annexation Map - St. Paul DispatchThe map taken from the St. Paul Pioneer dispatch, shows what happened when the all American city of Bloomington hopped across the Minnesota River Wednesday and annexed the 159-acre tract containing the black dog plant of northern states power company.It also invited to the Township of Burnsville to join with Bloomington to make up the largest municipality - in area - in Minnesota.Dec 22, 2016
Bloomington_Moves_to_Annex_25_Square_Miles.pdf
Bloomington Moves to Annex - Burnsville Plans to FightThe Bloomington city council reached south across the Minnesota river Tuesday to annex the tax-rich Black Dog plant of Northern States Power Co'. (NSP) in Burnsville township.
It also initiated efforts to merge the remainder of Burnsville with Bloomington to form a 65-square-mile city that would be the largest in area in Minnesota.
Special census workers from Bloomington today began gathering detailed information the city will present to the Minnesota municipal commission—the three-man body that will rule on the proposed annexation of the township.
At the same time, they delivered leaflets explaining the proposal.
In a rapid-fire council session yesterday afternoon, the council:
Annexed the Black Dog plant on a 159-acre site on petition of NSP.
Voted to petition the commission for the merger. Invited Burnsville to join in the petition.
Slashed the city portion of the Bloomington mill rate
in half—from 50 to 22 mills—on taxes payable in 1962.
Agreed to finance street maintenance and street light­ ing in the future from front-foot assessments rather than from general property taxes.
Proposed that citizens committees from both commu­nities explore every facet of the proposal, including disad­vantages as well as advantages of consolidation.
The Bloomington proposal was a well-guarded secret for nearly a year while discussions with NSP and quiet planning went on behind the scenes.
Burnsville officials were not consulted.
Dec 22, 2016
1961-10-9-WhereHasBDGone.pdf
Plaintive PosterPLAINTIVE POSTER carried by a Burnsville woman expresses a current lament of residents in the Dakota county township. Hearings will be held on the proposed merger of Bloomington and Burnsville the week of Oct. 9.
(Designated "unidentified woman" this might be Deanne Anderson who was secretary to the commissioners or early village council - jrj)
Dec 22, 2016
1961-08-24-MNStar-Protest.pdf
Burnsville 'Burns" Annexation protest meetingThe pictures above were taken Wednesday night at the town hall in Burnsville after the folks have learned that Bloomington, their neighbor to the north, annexed the black dog power plant and that actions had started to annex the remainder of Burnsville. Among the speakers at the meeting were Wallace Day, town board chairman, And Clyde Ryberg, Dakota County planning director. Roger Richardson, another member of the town board, and Jerome Aiken, a County Commissioner, also spoke briefly. After an hour Day said the board originally planned a private meeting to discuss possible legal action with attorneys.Dec 22, 2016
1961-08-24-BloomSun-BlackdogMergerX.pdf
Bloomington Sun-Suburbanite Annexation 1961-08-24Front page - five articles:
A convoy of Bloomington administrative workers, assisted by the League of Women Voters, took a census of Burnsville township Wednesday. The group also left with each home in Burnsville a leaflet Inviting discussions o[ the possible creation of a new suburban city. The city would be Bloomington, and Burnsville's 25 some square miles would be part of it.
Bloomington added 160 acres to its boundaries Tuesday – and the cool $100 million to its total property value. The city did it by annexing northern states powers gigantic black dog plant. Got a special meeting the city Council approved the expansion of Bloomington's boundaries to take in black dog...

NSP executive says step in the right direction (J. Roscoe Furber)

Mayor, manager in Gaston–Alphonse bit (Miklethun, Ray Olsen)

Black dog: how it affects you

(annexation map)
Dec 20, 2016
BV_Park_Commission_1965-09-08.pdf
Park Commission minutes September 8, 1965The Park Commission of the Village of Burnsville was called to order by Chairman Lares at 1;50 P.M. on September 8, 1965, at the Village Ha.11. Present were Lares, Don Casey, John Freeman, Betty Barile, Lyle Day, and Ba.lph Clover . Absent were Albert Sisler, Jerry Neiman, and Mrs. Sullivan.
Dec 19, 2016
1966-Form_of_Government_vote~0.pdf
Mayor's Committee Recommendation for Plan BAugust 1 1966: Special Committee

Duane A. Black 2500 Hayes Court
Thomas J. Campbell 10904 Dakota Court
Ralph Clover
2100 West 140th Street
Patriqk Connelly Sr.
Hwy. #13 and Minnegasco Rd.
Charles McDonald 42 Elm Circle
Mrs. Paul Scheunemann 1704 Raleigh Drive
Ben Sevey
13617 Pleasant Lane
Leonard Nelson
216 West 132nd Street
David D. Naas
Highway 13 & Cedar Avenue
Dec 19, 2016
Vote_Yes_for_Plan_B_1966.pdf
Vote Yes for Plan B on November 8 1966paid piece including Ralph Foster, Authur Puch, Pat Connelly, Michael O'Connor, Warren Freeshl, Burton Fosse, Thomas Campbell, Orville Wright, Myrl Mahaney, Alfred Hall, Ronald Goedken, Al Kraft, Ben Sevey, Mrs. Paul Scheunemann, Erling Laugfug, Russell StreeflandDec 19, 2016
Binder2.pdf
Candidate Affidavits 1965 Village OfficersRoger Richardson, Ray Connelly, Alan Ostby, Albert Hall, R. M. Lares, Thomas Schandle, Wallace Day, Charles Keeney (September - October 1965) Village Clerk and Notary Mike O'ConnorDec 19, 2016
New_and_old_bridges_Minnesota_River.pdf
Minnesota River new and old bridges 1960The new Lyndale highway 65 bridge is pictured, also the old drawbridge at left, looking south east from the air. The new bridge is 1387 feet long and has 2 27-foot roadways (two lanes) 4 foot center lane and to 3 1/2 foot sidewalks. The old bridge is being dismantled. November 17, 1960 Dakota County TribuneDec 16, 2016
Plan_B_Explained.pdf
Incorporation: Plan B ExplainedOn August 1st, the Burnsville village council established a citi­zens study committee, composed of nine people from Burnsville, to study the different forms of vil­lage government. After complet­ing its study, this committee sub­mitted its written report to the council and recommended adoption­ of plan B, also known as the council-manager form of govern­ment.Dec 10, 2016
Incorporation_Hearing_1962s.pdf
Incorporation Hearing - October 24,1962The wheels were turning for Burnsville to incorporate as a village. Where would the boundaries lie? Egan, Inver Grove Townships, and the Orchard Gardens area wanted to be heard.
This hearing was continued until November 14, 1962
Dec 10, 2016
BV_Early_Yrs-0130.jpg
Billy Goat BridgeBuilt around 1915 at junction of Judicial Road and Burnsville Parkway (modern name). Originally called McDermott's bridge. Later renamed for goats raised by Peter family who farm was in same location.Dec 07, 2016
BV_Early_Yrs-0129.jpg
Cedar Avenue Bridge in FogThe original Old Cedar Avenue Bridge was built in 1890. The bridge that stands now was built in 1920 and carried automobile traffic into the 1990s.[1] The narrow span continued operation as a bicycle trail until 2002 when it was deemed too unsafe. In 2008, $2 million in state funding was approved to reopen the bridge to bicyclists and pedestrians. Dec 07, 2016
BV_Early_Yrs-0025.jpg
Billy Goat BridgePhoto from the 1970s, the Bridge remains unchanged.Dec 07, 2016
LogosThenNow.jpg
Burnsville logosDec 05, 2016
1965-11-NewOffices.jpg
Town Hall gets two new offices.Burnsville town Hall has two new offices, one for Utilities and the other for Building, Roger Richardson, Board chairman said. The other office will be used by Ralph Ackerman of the Utilities department and another man when he is hired by the township.Dec 05, 2016
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